Monday, June 21, 2010

OK, Which is Oregon's most beautiful vineyard view?

Tamarah, my Digital Asset Manager, and I disagree which of my photos depicts Oregon's most beautiful vineyard view. Please help us settle the debate.
Which one of these photos is your favorite vineyard view? With your selection number, please make a 7-word note why your choice.

(Also sorry about the big spaces between some of the photos. I can't figure out how to get rid of them in blogger.)

#1 Chardonnay vine view at David Hill Vineyard and Winery near Forest Grove.














#2 Mount Hood and the Willamette Valley seen from Elk Cove Winery's Five Mountain vineyard.











#3 Knudsen vineyard seen from Bella Vida vineyard in the Red Hills above Dundee in the Willamette Valley.














#4 A Fall storm hangs over the grain silos at the edge Seven Hills Vineyard on the Oregon side of the Walla Walla Valley AVA.














#5 Fall colors on Abcela vineyard in the Umpqua Valley.















#6 Sun crashes through a summer storm over Valley View Winery's vineyard and winery barn in the Applegate Valley AVA near Jacksonville.












#7 The Pines 1852 winery's old Zin vines originally planted in 1852 or so now in the Columbia Valley AVA above The Dalles with snow-covered hills in the distance on the Washington side of the Columbia River.

The fine print:
• Almost all of these vineyard views are taken from private land. Please do not enter any vineyard without permission. You just might kill the vineyard by unknowingly carrying in phylloxera or some other disease.
• Please note that the photos are not in any particular order.
• All of these images are copyrighted with the US Copyright office. If you use any unauthorizedly–which just happened Friday–you pay me usage fee, plus $30,000 and attorney's fees.

14 comments:

JeanD said...

#1 - Love the dramatic slopes and sweet farmhouse.

Bud Rudiger said...

#2 The only one that is clearly Oregon.
#3 Best for color and composition.

studioartdirect said...

I think that #3 is stunning. Yes, it could be another part of the country, but it is not - it is the famous Red Hills. That said, I agree with Bud that #2 is clearly Oregon

Mick Rock said...

Most beautiful view, or most beautiful picture? There's a big difference. Some of these are nothing special as views, but the composition and light has made them beautiful: that's the art of the photographer.

Janis said...

A comment emailed directly to us:
J,
Couldn't log in to post, but here's my comment.

#2. Beautiful composition, color, sweep; the vineyards are crisp bountiful, the fog unearthly, and the inorganic element on the left, paradoxically, gives it even more life.

Janis said...

Another comment emailed:

For beauty and story 3. For second shot in the story 5. Rick

Janis said...

Another comment:

Hi Janis,
I like "#1 Chardonnay vine view at David Hill Vineyard and Winery near Forest Grove."

That's the image I'd use.

I think the fence post is a great anchor point, but I'm undecided about the bright white farm house on the left. The farmhouse is competing for my attention. I'd use that image personally, but decide what the first subject is: the farmhouse or the fence post. I'd make it the fence post and drop down the intensity of the farmhouse a little so the sign on the fence post is the brightest thing in the image.

If you're not opposed to Photoshop, you might also hide the light post and little grey blob thingie in front of the farmhouse. Less bright distractions = a winner.

Great photograph!
Hope that helps.

Janis said...

Another:

Janis,
I think photo #2 most represents Oregon vineyards and scenic Oregon. I consider the it a “wow” shot.
Ken

Janis said...

Another:

They are all very good Janis but I like the story #1 tells with the house and the marker on the post.
Dave

Janis said...

Another:

#1 Chardonnay

Janis said...

Another of the dozens emailed directly to us:

I like 7
My wife likes 5

John said...

I like the sense of mysteriousness in number 3 created by the fog and I realize though wine making has become so scientific that there are unknown factors in its creation which the photo states to me.

John said...

I like the sense of mysteriousness in number 3, created by the fog and I realize though wine making has become so scientific that there are unknown factors in its creation.

Kate said...

#1 gives you the sense you are standing there yourself.